The Year the UIS Almost Participated in the St. Jean Baptiste Parade

The Year the UIS Almost Participated in the St. Jean Baptist Parade #montreal #irish #history

United Irish Societies of Montreal Historian's Corner

1934 was a big year in two of Montreal’s founding communities. Both the the St. Patrick’s Society and the Société St. Jean Baptiste were celebrating their centennial anniversaries. The United Irish Societies of Montreal was led by John Loye, a man involved in numerous organizations both within and without the Irish community. Along the way it is likely Loye developed many friendships.

One of these friendships was developed with Dr. Victor Morin, a Past President of the Société St. Jean Baptiste, a fellow member of the Antiquarian Society, and a future president of the Royal Society of Canada. Clearly the Société St. Jean Baptiste of yesteryear had different aims and objectives than today’s.

On April 15th, 1934 Loye writes to Morin explaining that the long established custom is to extend an invitation to the annual parade in June to the St. Patrick’s Society and trying to convince the Société St…

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Michael Collins Pays Tribute to Grey Nuns and Famine Irish in Montreal on Celtic Trail of Tears — IrishCanadianFamineResearch

From the Irish Times: http://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/generation-emigration/why-are-6-000-irish-buried-under-a-montreal-traffic-island-1.2696681 Why are 6,000 Irish buried under a Montreal traffic island? Michael Collins finds an unusual Famine memorial during his 900km run about 20 hours ago Michael Collins in Canada The second day’s run begins under dark skies for Michael Collins. Photograph: Anne Petersen The Black Rock in Montreal marks the […]

via Michael Collins Pays Tribute to Grey Nuns and Famine Irish in Montreal on Celtic Trail of Tears — IrishCanadianFamineResearch

Thomas D’Arcy McGee

It has been two months since my last blog. Life gets busy at times and that has to take priority. Since we last met activities in the community are taking place. Notably, the annual Walk to the Stone took place on the usual date, the last Sunday of May. By all accounts it was well attended. Bloomsday Montreal recently wrapped up another festival.

With life getting busy things are status quo concerning the Historian portfolio but I’d like to share with you developments from the last few days. D’Arcy Quinn, great great grandson of Thomas D’Arcy McGee, contacted the St. Patrick’s Society in an effort to be able to enter the crypt where McGee’s remains. I got involved in my capacity as a Society vice president along with its Historian, Peter Shea. I wanted to make sure a connection was made between Mr. Quinn and the cemetery. In the end he was able to make a connection on his own. But as a result of our correspondence we agreed to meet last evening. He had to be a good guy; he’s a Quinn afterall. Continue reading Thomas D’Arcy McGee